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Free Example of Lifeboat Essay

Hardin argued that a finite world could support only a finite population in his lifeboat theory (Hardin 561). The premise of his argument is that countries operate like a lifeboat. After reaching the carrying capacity, countries are unable to accommodate more people, because they may upset the carrying capacity (Hardin 567). When human population reaches the carrying capacity, no more can be produced from the boat, until the death occurs that will create a chance or space for any additional.

 Hardin describes the USA as a lifeboat with many individuals swimming in the ocean to board the lifeboat, since it has a productive life (Hardin 567). According to Hardin, more people would pose the negative effects to the health and sustainability of the lifeboat. Thus, Hardin’s theory of the lifeboat has led to many ethical and moral discussions. The argument put forth by Hardin promotes the growth of a class of individuals considered to fit the most for survival. This idea emphasizes on maintaining the human populations at an appropriate level that can sustain itself; hence, assist in imparting knowledge that can help in achieving the aid indirectly, while checking the population growth and decreasing other populations. This would promote the wealth and resources of other countries and increasing their positions, when compared to other nations, and it affects the human beings’ living standards globally. The lifeboat theory has been used by environmentalists to encourage nations and corporations to stop the pollution and overexploitation of the natural resources, because all people share the life on earth, and no one has the right to overexploit the natural resources or pollute the environment.

The lifeboat metaphor should be interpreted to justify policies in the distribution of the world’s natural resources through the controlled foreign aid or immigrations. The world consists of rich and poor nations, and each nation is seen as a lifeboat having different classes of people. The ocean surrounding the lifeboats is occupied by poor individuals who would like to be getting places in the lifeboats and share the resources. The nations have limited carrying capacity; for instance, natural resources, such as land, have a limited opportunity to support the growing population. These are demonstrated by the current energy crisis, indicating that man has already exceeded the earth’s carrying capacity on land. International developments that have occurred, since Hardin first published his argument, globalization changed the economic prospects of the countries that might have needed the foreign aid in 1974 (Harding 576).

It was thought that globalization would improve the living standards of the poor, protect the environment and reverse the economic gap between the rich and the poor nations. However, the trend is not global, because the processes and the benefits associated with globalization are distributed unevenly globally. This means that a large percentage of human population is excluded from the benefits of globalization, because it divides human population into the impoverished and prosperous camps. Thus, the ethics surrounding the lifeboat has become very hostile when one thinks of the reproductive differences between rich and poor countries. Population in the lifeboat is doubling after approximately 87 years, and individuals swimming around the lifeboat are increasing twice as first as the rich are after every 35 years. This has put pressure on the world resources, and widened the gap that exists between the rich and the poor nations. The lifeboat metaphor is important in understanding the global economy of the 21st century, because the discussion on the lifeboat holds an assumption that the current global population trends will continue, whereas they may not.

Population growth rate will decline at a more rapid rate in the US, than in other nations. Thus, in sharing the natural resources, it is necessary to recognize the needs that are determined by the population size. Under a system of private property, it is a requirement that individuals who own property take the responsibility of ownership (Cairns 43). On the other hand, resources that are shared equally, like pasture land, may match the corresponding responsibility to protect them. Therefore, in a populated world with less perfect humans, the mutual ruin of the resources may occur with no control; hence leading to the tragedy of the commons. Other examples include water resources which are currently affected by the pollution, since they are treated as the common ones.

A large percentage of human population is excluded from the benefits of globalization, because it divides the human population into the impoverished and prosperous camps. Thus, the ethics surrounding the lifeboat has become very hostile, when we consider the reproductive differences between the rich and the poor countries. Population in the lifeboat is doubling after approximately 87 years, and individuals swimming around the lifeboat are increasing twice as first as the rich are after every 35 years. This has put pressure on world resources, and widened the gap between the rich and the poor. Before 1974, the US had a population of approximately 210 million people with an increase in population at a rate of 0.8 percent annually. This has made the ethics of the lifeboat be hostile, when we consider the reproductive differences between the rich and the poor. The lifeboat metaphor is important in understanding the global economy of the 21st century. It is more likely that the rate of the population increase will reduce more at a rapid rate in the US than other countries. Thus, in sharing the natural resources, it is necessary to recognize the needs that are determined by the population size. The main error of the lifeboat metaphor and sharing is that it may result in the tragedy of the commons. However, under a system of the private property, it is a requirement that individuals who own property take the responsibility of the ownership. On the other hand, resources that are shared equally may not match the corresponding responsibility to protect them. Therefore, in a populated world with less perfect human beings, mutual ruin of the resources may occur with no controls; hence leading to the tragedy of the commons.

The 9/11 terrorist attacks changed the purpose of the U.S. aid to foreign countries, since the only appropriate condition involved the financial resources to solve the problems with no attention paid to the development issues (Cairns 49). It also focuses on the global economic institutions that favor the rich nations that are forced by the poor nations at their detriment. Foreign aid should focus on improving the better farming practices of the poor nations, so that they can adjust and cope with the global crises. In addition, foreign aid should focus on the development issues.

In conclusion, the lifeboat justifies the demands of the 21st century, because when the survival of man is compromised, the acceptance of responsibilities will be based on a precondition that will make the poor fall out. These facts involve the extrapolation of the current trends of the population increase. Nonetheless, the rate of population increase is falling faster in the class presently accommodated in the lifeboat, than those outside the lifeboat. As extrapolated, the future may turn out to be much worse than predicted. Thus, without a sovereign global government in productive issues, the foreseeable future survival of humankind will demand a government of actions by the ethics of a lifeboat.

Code: Sample20

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