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Custom National Culture of France Essay

France is a European nation whose national culture can be described as per the seven cultural dimensions. In terms of the achievement versus ascription, France has adapted a national culture where people are given national duties according to their abilities to produce good results. In order for one to qualify as a potential manager of a public or private institution he/she must prove his/her achievement credentials. If an individual wants to continue serving any given office he/she must continue improving his/her credentials by continually attaining great achievements. With regard to the aspect of individualism versus communitarianism, the national culture of the French people can be said to be one that embraces individualism to communitarianism. In this country people are encouraged to make individual decisions and act according to their own judgment. In both private and public lives, people in France are encouraged to embrace the culture of individualism rather than embracing collectivism culture (Hofstede, 2003; Drucker, 1992).

In relation to the internal versus external aspects, the national culture of France presents an environment where the citizens embrace internal culture. The citizens of France believe that their mistakes as a nation are of their own making. They do not blame other countries for their problems but they embrace the culture of accepting their problems and they look for solutions to their problems internally. The French national culture embraces emotional aspect in place of neutral aspect. The people of France usually show their feelings openly when their country is in crises. They do not hide their feelings toward certain forms of actions taken by the government or individuals within the country. In relation to the matters to do with separation of both public and private life the national culture of France does encourage people to embrace specific culture. The people of France usually separate their public lives from private lives (Griswold, 2008; Drucker, 1992).

When it comes to the matters of managing various activities the French national culture embraces synchronous culture. They do embrace the culture of doing different things at the same time. You can find a person doing activities at the same time. The French national culture does not embrace the culture of doing one thing at a time. In matters to do with their ways of life and rules applying the same way in other countries the French national culture embraces universalism. The people of France do believe that their rules can be applied in the same way they are used at home at any given country in the world without making any changes. Their national culture does embrace formal rules at the expense of relationships (Hofstede, 2003).

Malaysia national culture embraces individual achievement culture rather than ascription culture. Achievement of an individual determines who gets a certain post in the public life. The national cultures of Malaysia do embrace individualism to communitarianism. In this country people are encouraged to make individual decisions and act according to their own judgment. In both private and public lives people in Malaysia are encouraged to embrace the culture of individualism rather than embracing collectivism culture. The national culture of Malaysia embraces internal culture. The people of Malaysia believe that the mistakes as a nation are of their own making. They do not blame other countries for their problems but they embrace the culture of accepting their problems and they look for solutions to their problems internally. The people of Malaysia embrace neutral culture where they do not express their feelings openly in relation to management of public affairs (Hofstede, 2001; Hofstede, 1993).

In relation to matters to do with separation of both public and private life, the national culture of Malaysia does encourage people to embrace diffuse culture. The people of Malaysia usually do not separate public and private lives. When it comes to matters of managing various activities the Malaysia national culture embraces synchronous culture. They do embrace the culture of doing different things at the same time. You can find a person doing activities at the same time. The Malaysian national culture does not embrace the culture of doing one thing at a time. Malaysian people embrace particularism culture where they embrace relationships at the expense of formal rules. They believe that situations are the ones that dictate how various ideas are going to be applied (Hackman, 1990; Colls & Dodd, 1986).

Holland is a European nation that embraces the following aspects of culture according to Trompenaars cultural dimensions. Holland has adapted national culture where by people are given national duties according to their abilities to produce good results. If an individual wants to continue serving any given office he/she must continue improving his/her credentials by continually attaining great achievements. The national cultures of Holland do embrace individualism to communitarianism. In this country people are encouraged to make individual decisions and act according to their own judgment. The national culture of Holland embraces internal culture. The citizens of Holland believe that the mistakes as a nation are of their own making (Easthorpe, 2004; Gitelson et al., 2001).

Dutch national culture embraces emotional aspect in place of neutral aspect. They do not hide their feelings toward certain forms of actions taken by the government or individuals within the country. In relation to matters to do with separation of both public and private life, the national culture of Holland does encourage people to embrace a specific culture. The people of Holland usually separate their public lives with private lives. When it comes to matters of managing various activities Dutch national culture embraces sequential culture. They do embrace the culture of undertaking one item at a time. In matters to do with their ways of life and rules applying the same way in other countries Dutch national culture embraces universalism. The citizens of Holland do believe that their rules can be applied in the same way they are used at home at any given country in the world without making any changes (Hofstede, 2007; Harris et al., 2003; Downing, 2003).

The Pakistani society embraces the forms of national cultures that uniquely define the Pakistani society. Pakistani national culture embraces ascription culture rather than achievement culture. Achievement of an individual does not determine who gets a certain post in the public life. People get posts according to who they know in the government. The national culture of Pakistan embraces communitarianism culture. This culture encourages collectivism decision making process rather than individualism. The people of Pakistan embrace external culture. They believe that their problems are not of their own making but external factors contribute to their problems (Easthorpe, 2004). The people of Pakistan embrace neutral culture where they do not express their feelings openly in relation to management of public affairs. In relation to matters to do with separation of both public and private life, the national culture of Pakistan does encourage people to embrace diffuse culture. The people of Pakistan usually do not separate public and private lives. When it comes to matters of managing various activities the Pakistan national culture embraces synchronous culture. They do embrace the culture of doing different things at the same time. You can find a person doing activities at the same time. Pakistanis embrace particularism culture where they embrace relationships at the expense of formal rules. They believe that situations are the ones that dictate how various ideas are going to be applied (Hofstede, 2001; Edwards, 2005).

Conclusion

This essay sought to investigate how Fons Trompenaars’ ideas can be applied in real life situations. The essay main objective was to use the seven cultural dimensions as outlined by Fons Trompenaars to describe national cultures. In order to achieve this objective the essay investigated the national cultures of four different countries using the seven national cultural dimensions as defined in Trompenaars seven cultural dimensions. These dimensions include internal versus external, individualism versus collectivism, neutral versus emotional, universalism versus particularism, achievement versus ascription, time orientation and specific versus diffuse.

Custom National Culture of France Essay

Code: Sample20

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