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The books of 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel narrate the history of Israelís early Kingdom through the lives of Saul and David, the first two kings God chose to rule over His people. Chapters 9 and 16 of 1 Samuel describe how both kings were chosen from humble beginnings, while chapters of 2 Samuel describe the reactions of both kings when they were confronted with their sin. When they were confronted, Saul did not repent, while David pleaded for Godís mercy.

These passages were chosen because they teach believers that past success in Christianity is not a guarantee for living a righteous life. Rather, a righteous life is gained by continually examining oneself to seeking the guidance of God. This teaching is applicable to a bible study for believers exploring the way to continuously live a life that pleases God. A study of differences between the reactions of the two kings of Israel when confronted with sin will show how believers can stay firm in their walk with God despite failing over and over.

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The teaching series will trace the similarities and differences between the two kingís experiences to show why Saul failed while David succeeded in living a life that pleased God.† Lesson 1 examines their early experiences, Lesson 2 focuses on an incidence of disobedience for both, Lesson 3 focuses on their reactions after recognizing sin, while lesson 4 shows what made David better than Saul.

Series Outline

Lesson 1: The anointing of Saul and David (1 Samuel 9; 1 Samuel 16)

The objective is to show that both Saul and David were humble men who pleased God so He chose them and exalted them.

Lesson 2: Saul and David both fall into Sin (1 Samuel 13: 1-14; 2 Samuel 12:1-12)

This lesson shows how the kings fell and what they did after they were confronted with their sin

Lesson 3: Recognition of Sin (I Samuel 13:14; 2 Samuel 12: 13-16)

This lesson examines the reactions of both kings when confronted with their sin.

Lesson 4: Results of Sin (1 Samuel 13:13-14, 31:6; 2 Samuel 12:13-14)

This lesson shows the repercussions of sin and the impact of oneís reaction after sin on his future life.

Lessons Guide

Lesson 1: The anointing of Saul and David (1 Samuel 9; 1 Samuel 16)

Key point: Those who rely on God and trust in Him are counted as righteous just as Abraham was. God sees the hearts of men and exalts those who humble themselves.

Examining word

  1. From 1Sam 9:21, how does Saul see/describe himself? How is he described differently from the others?
  2. From 1 Sam 16:5-13, how is David described differently from his brothers?

Application

  1. How do we view/describe ourselves? Do we walk in humility as people that the Lord would choose to exalt?
  2. In a world where the motto is Ďme firstí, how does the command to walk humbly affect how we interact with unbelievers?

Lesson 2: Saul and David both fall into Sin (1 Samuel 13: 1-14; 2 Samuel 12:1-12)

Key point: God chose and anointed both kings for their humility and anointed them to rule over His people Israel. However, they both sinned as kings.

Examining word

  1. From 1 Samuel 13: 1-14, how did Saul sin? Was his sin due to his position as king, or was it due to a character flaw? Why was Saul afraid of his people scattering?
  2. From 2 Samuel 12:1-12, how did David sin? Was his sin due to his position as king or was it due to a character flaw? Why did he have to choose a married woman when he could have had any other as a king?

Application

  1. What sorts of sins do we find ourselves habitually falling into?
  2. Why do we fall into those sins despite knowing they are sins?
  3. What lessons can we learn from Saulís and Davidís experiences?

Lesson 3: Recognition of Sin (I Samuel 13:14; 2 Samuel 12: 13-16)

Key point: When Saul sinned, he did not repent, while David sought Godís mercy with tears and fasting. David humbled himself before God and showed that he recognized his sin and needed Godís forgiveness. Saul went on with his activities without stopping to seek God. In fact, Saul attempted to justify his actions instead of acknowledging his sin.

Examining word

  1. After Samuelís confrontation of Saul over his disobedience of Godís commands, what does I Samuel 13:15 say Saul did after?
  2. After Nathanís confrontation of David over the murder of Uriah, what does 2 Samuel 12:15 say David did after?

Application

  1. How different were Davidís and Saulís reactions to the realization of sin?
  2. Why did Saul not seek Godís mercy as David did? What did David know about Godís character that Saul did not that gave him the confidence to seek Godís forgiveness?
  3. What sort of attitude should we have in order to acknowledge when we fall and get back to God?

Lesson 4: What are the results of sin? (1 Samuel 13:13-14, 31:6; 2 Samuel 12:13-14)

Key point: Those who acknowledge their sin obtain mercy and blessing, but those who do not turn away from their sin reap the wages of sin, which is death. Moreover, the choice to repent or not affects not only the sinner, but his children and their children.

Examining word

  1. From 1 Samuel 13:13-14, what does Samuel say to Saul concerning the result of his sin? From 1 Samuel 31:6, why does Saul die with his children?
  2. From 2 Samuel 12:13-14, what does Nathan say to David concerning the result of his sin? Was Davidís sin forgiven even before he repented?
  3. The two prophets bring Godís words to the two kings, but Nathan already knew that God had forgiven David, while Samuel said nothing about Saulís forgiveness? Does this mean that our prevailing attitude is what determines whether we are forgiven or not?†

Application

  1. When we are confronted with our sin, what is our first reaction?† Do we immediately acknowledge our sin and seek Godís mercy, or do we ignore it?
  2. What lessons do we learn from David about maintaining our relationship with God? Why is it important to keep a repentant attitude?
Code: writers15

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